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Accept symbol-based input

For some users with cognitive disabilities or who are learning a new language, it is much easier to understand concepts that are displayed in images rather than text. An on-screen communication aid can allow input by clicking on images rather than letters. For example, the user may ask when dinner is by clicking on a “clock” image followed by a “food” image. This input can then be converted to text or read aloud by the computer.

Discussion by Disabilities (Benefits & Preferred Behaviors)

Cognitive, Language, Learning Disabilities & Low Literacy

Using symbols instead of text can greatly simplify input for people with cognitive, language, and learning disabilities and those with literacy problems.

Existing Products

Please note that these products are not necessarily endorsed by RtF, but represent the range of available options.

Open Source and free

These products are free and their source code may be modified with few restrictions.

Free, not necessarily open source

These products are free to use, but may have strict restrictions on viewing and modifying source code.

Commercial, with free trial

These products are free to try for a limited period of time or with limited functionality. They must be purchased for full functionality.

Commercial, no free trial

These products must be purchased to be used, and did not offer free trials at the time of posting.

Learn more about digital literacy and digital skills.

Learn more about learning disabilities and how they affect an individual’s life also beyond academics.

Learn more about cognitive disabilities, medical conditions and examples of what people with intellectual or cognitive deficits experience in everyday life.

wespeak

by AlanBell

Augmentative and Alternative Communication For the Web